Tag Archives: Online Community

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Vote Slow Family Online Most Awesome Parent Blogger

Slow Family Online has been nominated for a Most Awesome Parent Blogger Award from Red Tricycle and giggle!

Please help us win by voting for Slow Family by October 31.

 

Vote for Me

All voters in all categories — from coffee shops to baby strollers —  are entered for a chance to win a $500 Gift Certificate to giggle, a Flip Video Camera (value $300) and a large organic plush Winnie-the-Pooh (value $110).

Vote for Slow Family, let me know about it by commenting on our Facebook page or on the blog, and you’ll also be entered for a chance to win a cute, 100% cotton baby “Red Tricycle” T-shirt! The winner will be chosen by random drawing.

Red Tricycle is a wonderful site featuring fun family ideas in Seattle, Portland, San Francisco Los Angeles and San Diego.

Rhythm of the Home: Make an Autumn Leaf Placemat

The Autumn issue of Rhythm of the Home came out today. I’m thrilled to have an article in it:  How to Make an Autumn Leaf Placemat.

This beautiful online magazine has been one of my favorites since its inception. Each season brings lovely and inspiring ideas from a terrific array of bloggers and crafters who write about fun family craft projects, family connection and balance, nature, inspiration, and love.

The Autumn issue marks the full round of the seasons for Rhythm of the Home, and the spirit of Autumn comes through in so many of the pieces. Congratulations on the 1-year anniversary!

Every story in the current issue features something lovely. To name but a few, there’s an interview with Salley Mavor, the creator of  Felt Wee Folk. There are stories about creating community with the NoCo Nature Tribe and Mothers Circles, and honoring family rhythms with a Blessing Hour.

Pieces explore Simple Living, Finding Balance, Loving with Intention, Mama Journaling, and Making a House a Home. I learned about Moroccan Babywearing and Life in a Viking Village, the tradition of Mother Roasting for post-partum women, and a creature called the Halloween Sugar Sprite. I continued to enjoy Kristie Burns‘ nice writing about the Four Temperaments, this time focusing on their relation to Fall.

There are tons of lovely and inspiring craft projects. I want to make them all! They include a Harvest Basket, a Story Table, a Playscape, yummy Pumpkin Bread and Autumn Spice Scones, Flower Pounding, Autumn Fleece Washing, a Thankfulness Journal, a Family Library Bag, and many more fiber, cooking, and other projects.

Can you tell I’m crazy about this magazine? Come on over and get inspired for Fall.

Click to Read

Photos by Susan Sachs Lipman

Happy Six-month Anniversary to Slow Family Online

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After much contemplation, writing, photographing, observing, and living, Slow Family Online began exactly six months ago. It started by using the model of the Front Porch, as a way to encourage people to literally take a break from busy lives, sit, breathe, share, craft, play, and watch the kinds of activities in nature that one might enjoy from a front porch rocker.

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Six months ago, I posted about my burgeoning deck garden in spring; the nesting robins; our traditional milkman; and my discovery of Facebook, which has since led to a wonderful extended community of far-flung friends in Australia, Canada, New York, Seattle, and even closer by who I just don’t see often but can now keep up with somewhat regularly.

In addition to being a forum for observation, expression and tips, Slow Family Online has also quickly become a community. Longtime friends and new readers from as far away as Swaziland, Italy and the United Arab Emirates have exchanged tips and comments on subjects ranging from nostalgia, childhood, biking and books to gardening, sustainability, and cheese.

I thank everyone for contributing to the richness of this site, and I hope many more will continue to do so.

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Just today, Slow Family Online passed 3,500 visitors. By far the most popular post remains my rundown of Tulips in the deck garden — and it is just about the time again to browse tulip catalogs and garden centers, to choose the most promising bulbs and refrigerate them for planting later this fall.

What else has been popular? My instructions on how to make a tie-dyed laundry bag, my ode to our milkman, our trip to the local tidepools in June, tips for riding San Francisco’s famed cable cars, the cheese reviews, the newborn deer, the Baroque Pearl perfume launch, and, I’m happy to report, the linked blog sites of friends.

What are some ways people find us? Some subscribe on Google Reader, some follow Slow Family on Facebook and Twitter, some regularly stop in, and others are seeking specific information via search engines. Some of the most interesting search-engine terms people have used to arrive at this web site include:

Daffodil hunter, world’s smallest deer, largest lettuce, retro flower, balsamic vinegar, erotic tulip, extreme tulip, bee gardening, pumpkin container, daydreams, red things, white trails on lettuce, helicopter parents, old filing cabinet, silk screen, sea squirts, starfish, delphinium seeds, signal flower of love, sweet peas and trains, repurpose old T-shirt, folding bike, gouda slice, movie themed cupcakes, western themed cupcakes, Italy TV dinner, tulip mania, Pugs Leap Farm, processed cheese, Pullman porters, caveman blue, milk delivery, perseid meteor Brooklyn, gold country fair pigs, Irish bar end of cable car route, vintage swing nightgown, fondant cake, pear brandy, perfumers box, cheese winner, victorian ad, fisherman’s wharf, do locals take cable cars, hand sewing, coast starlight, peach fruit, and the rather poetic undersea world.

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What’s in Slow Family Online’s future? More seasonal and holiday ideas and rituals; fun crafts, activities and observations; ideas for slowing down and gaining quality time; news about sustainability and the greater Slow Movement; garden, nature and city fun; and community among other readers who have similar values and desires regarding the quality of family and neighborhood life.

Slow Family Online is on Facebook, too, as a way of extending the conversation. Please let me know if you’re inspired, curious, dubious, or just have something to add.

Warm regards, Suz

fall-leaf

Photos by Susan Sachs Lipman

Slow Family Online on Food News Journal

WhitePeach

Slow Family Online is mentioned on today’s Food News Journal. Each day, Food News Journal rounds up the freshest food writing in the mainstream media and among the blogs. I am thrilled to be included!

Photo by Susan Sachs Lipman

Susan is Enjoying Facebook

OK, I know I’m late to the party. I resisted it for some time. But, you know what? Facebook is fun. A lot of fun. It’s also provoked a complete flood of nostalgia for every station of my life. There’s a page for Roosevelt Elementary School, where I spent grades K-6 and where I thought a little hillock of land on its corner at Lincoln and Montana was a mountain (and I really did fly off it once, using a wind-blown umbrella as a sail. Really.) My brother’s on the site — he’s the one who convinced me to join — and he has assured that every business on that stretch of Montana has been memorialized. I posted about the candy I used to buy at Patton’s Pharmacy — Everyone stopped there after school and ogled the whole aisle of impossibly-colored wrappers. My favorite, for the record, was the Chick-o-Stick.

Then there’s a group for reminiscing about the whole town — the Santa Monica of my childhood, with it’s open-air promenade that is now a chic shopping destination, but was then a modest collection of stores that were grand only in terms of their size, their buildings proclaiming “Toni” and “Thom McCann” in the scrawled, optimistic text of the 60s. I posted about eyeing the paisley and other very hip shoes at Vin Baker, before buying the cheaper platforms at Carl’s, and about Sol’s Yardage, a warehouse-sized place where women would sit at the long, slanted wooden tables, in rows across from one another, licking their forefingers as they turned the pages in the pattern catalogs. There was mention of the Smuggler as a “head shop”, though, of course, it was more — a den packed with turquoise rings and macrame chokers and tiny vials of floral scents and buttons with hilarious (to a teen) sayings. I contributed the Sorrento Grill to the memory bank, a wonderful fry joint on the beach with checked tablecloths and black-and-white photos of old volleyball players and surfers on its walls. It was torn down after the summer of 1974. Appropriately, the last song I remember weeping out of its jukebox was “Alone Again Naturally”.

Then there is perhaps the weirdest Santa Monica memory. For years, every time I’d walk or drive by the retaining wall that sat nestled into the bluffs on Pacific Coast Highway at Montana, I’d see it: huge, black graffitied letters, of a sort that would never stay up for years today, proclaiming: “Tommy Surko says, for my girl, there’s only one. Tommy Surko.” I always wondered what happened to Tommy Surko and whether he got the girl. (Or any girl.) On Facebook, I might not find out, but I can at least find people who also remember Tommy Surko and that particular time and place.

There’s a junior high group, of course (with the word “Survivors” in its title.) And high school ones. And groups for people of similar vintage who went to the same dance clubs I did, in L.A. and then in New York, and who remember every incarnation of the floating underground ones whose names I could never hope to recapture by myself. And groups for people who just like the same architecture, or philosophy, or relatively arcane hobbies and passions. That’s the beauty of this large selection of people, and why I’m finding it so different from the smaller boards I’ve been on since 1991.

I’ve also found people and they’ve found me. These are good friends who live in other parts of the country that I’d been in occasional touch with. Now I can see what they’re reading and listening to and thinking about and doing, and what their kids — and even they — look like. And I’m really enjoying that.

It’s only been a few days. I’m not ready to proclaim, “Facebook, C’est Moi!” For one thing, its interface and search functions are clunky and inept. I don’t need the e-mail updates when a stranger writes “You go, Girl!” to a friend. But, for the most part, I’m finding it one more fun aspect of a full life, and thinking about all the connections that are duplicated for other people’s hometowns and elementary schools, not to mention the people finding companionship, or at the very least a group of people who also like to eat jelly doughnuts, is cause enough to smile.

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