Tag Archives: Health

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Take Drazil Kids Tea Back to School and or on a Family Adventure

My whole family is thrilled that we found Drazil Kids Tea just in time to enjoy this summer and pack into healthy school lunches. Drazil is immediately, amazingly good! The flavors are fantastic. Anna instantly loved Grape Bliss. Each of the other flavors – Punch Passion, Tropical Burst, and Yummy Berry – was a favorite of other kid (and adult) testers. This tea is really good.

In addition to the fabulous taste, there are a lot of things for parents to be excited about when it comes to Drazil Tea. The portability is fantastic. We’ve already taken Drazil along on many bike rides and hikes. It is backpack- and lunchbox- ready.

Drazil Tea is also a healthy alternative to many juices and juice drinks. Drazil has 35% less natural sugars than 100% juice and half the calories of many juices and juice drinks. It’s sweetened with real fruit juices, rather than cane sugar. The teas are caffeine-free and contain lots of naturally occurring antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. The yummy taste comes from a unique herbal blend of Hibiscus, Rose Hips, Rooibos, Pomegranate, and fruit pieces. The teas are pasteurized and contain nothing artificial. All good!

We’re thrilled that we can find Drazil Tea throughout Northern California and on Amazon because we will be stocking up.

Enter the Giveaway

One lucky reader of this blog will win a variety pack of Drazil Kids Tea (32 boxes in 4 flavors). Follow the instructions in the widget below for your chance to win.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

This post is sponsored by Drazil Tea. The opinions expressed are my own.

You Can Help with Cancer Research

More than 1,000,000 people in the U.S. get cancer each year. Chances are, someone you know has been deeply affected by cancer. Every day, more than 400 lives are saved from cancer thanks, in large part, to cancer research. If you had a chance to help with cancer research, would you? We, in the San Francisco Bay Area and elsewhere, now have that chance.

Cancer Prevention Study-3 (CPS-3) is a long-term study that seeks to better understand the factors (lifestyle, environmental, genetic) that cause or prevent cancer and ultimately help eliminate cancer as a major health concern for future generations.

Past long-term American Cancer Society studies have played a major role in cancer prevention. Past studies have demonstrated, among other things, the links between smoking, obesity, hormones, physical activity, and diet and cancer risk.

CPS-3 offers a once-in-a-generation opportunity to be personally involved in research that will advance the American Cancer Society’s understanding of the lifestyle, behavioral, environmental, and genetic factors that cause cancer.

How can you get involved? Involvement in CPS-3 includes:

  • A short in-office visit during which you’ll read and sign a consent form, complete a survey, provide some physical measurements, and give a small blood sample (about 20-30 minutes).
  • A longer at-home questionnaire (about 45 minutes).
  • Follow-up questionnaires (which could take as little as minutes, and no more than an hour) by mail every two years (for at least 20 years).
  • Participants must be between the ages of 30 and 65 years and have no personal history of cancer (not including basal or squamous cell skin cancer) to join.

CPS-3 is one of the most important factors in the fight against cancer, and it’s one that ordinary people can help with. Although it requires a long-term commitment, the time required every other year is minimal, often less time than it would take to eat one dinner. Many people participate in CPS-3 to honor someone who has battled cancer, or for other personal reasons.

Participants will receive updated information about the study’s findings. The Bay Area represents a particularly unique opportunity for researchers because of its varied population.

Here ‘s where to participate in the CPS-3 Study in the Bay Area:

  • Alameda (July 20-August 3)
  • Marin County (July 24-August 7)
  • San Francisco (July 17-August 10)
  • San Mateo (July 24-August 10)
  • Santa Clara (July 13-August 10)

Find a CPS-Study in the U.S. near you.

I’ll be participating. Won’t you?

I was compensated for my participation in learning and sharing about CPS-3 through Women Online/The Mission List. All opinions stated here are my own.

Bounce for Fun and Health on a Trampoline from Big Game Hunters

The idea of jumping on a trampoline just makes me smile. With good reason. It’s tons of fun. Jumping on a trampoline can be exhilarating and enjoyable, even for kids and adults who don’t consider themselves athletic. Bouncing and rebounding on a trampoline also have multiple health benefits. These activities provide tremendous aerobic exercise and muscle toning without joint stress; improve circulation, coordination and balance; reduce toxins and stress; enhance bone mass in children; and much more. Trampoline skills contribute to children’s physical, cognitive and social development, researchers say. Trampolines also get kids outdoors, another tremendous contributor to health and wellbeing.

Above all, jumping is joyful, natural and fun for people of all ages.

Trampolines and their use have changed a lot since my childhood. All but gone are the exposed springs and open-sided trampolines. There’s even a greater variety of trampoline color, shape and size than there once was.

Big Game Hunters, a long-time expert in the trampoline field, offers trampolines from many different brands, including Sky High, JumpKing and TP; trampoline accessories (like enclosures, pads to cover the springs, and ladders to help people up and down); and assistance in choosing the right trampoline for your needs. Big Game Hunters also offers giant garden games, super whimsical playhouses, croquet sets, sleds, and lots of other items to enhance outdoor play and fun for families and others.

Photos and images: Big Game Hunters.

This post is sponsored by Big Game Hunters. The content is my own.

 

Slow News Day: Car-Free and Carefree

Two stories recently came out about car-free living. One is from the delightful blog, New Urban Habitat, Abby Quillen’s always wonderful, inspiring and useful collection of stories about living more simply, sustainably, healthfully, and happily. Her piece, Lessons in Car-Free Living, contains a wealth of benefits and tips for getting your own family out of the car for short, simple runs.

This is definitely something we’ve been trying to do more increasingly in my household, and have been having good success. We combine bike riding for short distances with public transportation for longer commutes.

Another fan of public transit turns out to be one of the stars of my favorite TV show, the highly evocative, endlessly dissectible Mad MenVincent Kartheiser, who plays ad executive (and new father) Pete Campbell on the show. He recently revealed to the New York Times his utter joy of taking public transportation in Los Angeles, and using it as an opportunity to relax, study his lines, and commune with his fellow passengers — all enthusiasms I share (usually) when taking my local ferries, buses and trains. Said Kartheiser:

I like that my life slows down when I go places. I have all these interactions with the human race and I can watch people living their life and not just in their car.

He also mentioned a recent consumer study from Learning Resources Network that noted that motorists ages 21-30 generally don’t grant car ownership and driving with the same status that older people do. According to the study, this group favors mass transit for commuting and car sharing services, like Zipcar, for longer trips. It turns out that companies like Hertz are listening — They are expanding car sharing choices, especially in big cities and around college campuses.

At 80 million strong, the article notes that this 20-30 age group represents a very large cohort. According to William Draves, president of Learning Resources Network, “This group views commuting a few hours by car a huge productivity waste when they can work using PDAs while taking the bus and train.”

That’s how I feel! Productivity and joy far outweigh the convenience of driving my individual car, especially as I happen to enjoy walking (to/from the public transit), too  — and sometimes find driving a bit stressful. (Of course, the area in question has to offer good public transit and city planning for this to equate.)

The article also notes that, in survey after survey, 20-30 year olds say that they believe cars are damaging to the environment. Even hybrid electric vehicles don’t seem to be changing young consumers’ attitudes much.

Yay for the green young people and others who are adapting habits that are good for their own physical and psychological health and that of the planet. This young group, and the one coming up after it, offers plenty of cause for hope.

I’ll also add that, as with many personal choices, there is usually not one that is all good or one that is all bad. I believe everyone needs to make his or her own choices based on what feels right for them. Sometimes, for me, taking the car is the right thing to do. I remain cheered by the general attitudes and consciousness of the people quoted in this article, including the corporations that are following suit by offering alternative rental cars where young people are.

Photos by Susan Sachs Lipman: Car-Free Sundays, a Summer 2010 New York City program

You might also like: Bike to Work and School Day

New Research Links Time in Nature with Children’s Health

An important new paper has just been released that links children’s time in nature to their overall health. Using Nature and Outdoor Activity to Improve Children’s Health was published in the journal, Current Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care.

According to the forward, “Within just one generation, the definition of ‘play’ has changed dramatically among children in industrialized countries.” Before the 1980s, most children were encouraged to play outside, and much of that play was unsupervised. In January, 2010, the Kaiser Family Foundation reported that children ages 8- 18 spend an average of more than 7.5 hours per day using some sort of electronic screen.

These same children, the paper cites, may be the first generation at risk for having shorter lifespans than their parents and a variety of chronic conditions in childhood, such as childhood obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, asthma, vitamin D deficiency, ADHD, and depression.

The good news? Outdoor activity in natural environments may directly benefit children’s health in such areas as: Building and maintaining healthy bones and muscles; reducing the risk of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease; reducing feelings of depression and anxiety; and promoting psychological well-being.

I wrote more about the paper for the Children & Nature Network. That group also puts out a lot of excellent research about the many benefits of nature for children.

Photo by Susan Sachs Lipman

Slow News: New White House Programs Support Children’s Nutrition & Play

Exciting news for those who care about children’s health and nutrition and the movement to get kids outside to play — The Obama Administration has revealed two important new programs that address children’s health and well-being: President Obama’s “America’s Great Outdoors” Initiative, which he signed Friday, April 16, and First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” campaign to eradicate childhood obesity.

I wrote about both of these on the Children & Nature Network blog. Here is President Obama signing the America’s Great Outdoors Initiative:

The White House Conference on America’s Great Outdoors, at which the signing took place, offered an exciting day of speeches and panel discussions. These revealed that the current administration cares deeply about the environment and the generation of children who are set to inherit American lands, as well as their stewardship. Said President Obama:

When we see America’s land, we understand what an incredible bounty that we have been given.  And it’s our obligation to make sure that the next generation enjoys that same bounty.

We’ll help families spend more time outdoors, building on what the First Lady has done through the “Let’s Move” initiative to encourage young people to hike and bike and get outside more often.

There was plenty of inspiration offered by many speakers, including this from Environmental Protection Agency Secretary Lisa Jackson:

Our open spaces have inspired our artists and encouraged our pioneers.

It was thrilling to me to listen along at home and hear our land and open spaces being revered by such a powerful group that was convened for the day at the White House, for the purpose of promoting nature for its beauty and value to people of all ages. My “play-by-play” coverage of the conference is here.

The other great recent White House development is Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” campaign and its April 9 Childhood Obesity Summit, which I was able to watch by live podcast. The Summit was an extremely encouraging event. The “Let’s Move” Campaign centers around the availability of healthy food, in schools and all neighborhoods, information and resources for parents, and physical activity.

Michelle Obama has noted that her work in the White House vegetable garden, in addition to her own family’s experiences trying to work good nutrition and health into a busy lifestyle, encouraged her to begin her campaign.

I was very cheered that outdoor play was revealed as an important part of the campaign and the efforts of high-level government officials.

Here’s Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, from his opening remarks:

If you want our students to be much more successful academically, they have to be active.

He called for “more well-rounded educations for children” and those, he noted, include P.E. and recess. This is a sea change away from the culture of academic pressure and achievement that has permeated the American school system over the recent past.

According to Interior Secretary Salazar:

We need to get our young people and our society as a whole more connected to the outdoors than they have been.

A whole “breakout” discussion then centered about physical activity and play, which is one of the platforms of the “Let’s Move” campaign. That session included discussions of such positive things as ways to deal with parental fear about outdoor play, increased access to natural spaces in suburban and urban settings, location of parks near schools and homes, safe routes to schools and parks, available transportation to green spaces, access to activities beyond organized sports, resources for parents, and a culture of increased walking instead of driving for short distances.

All of these issues concerning green spaces and communities, walking, play, and access to fresh, healthy food, are connected to the Slow Movement.

Again, this was at the White House.

My blog post about the Childhood Obesity Summit is here.

Complete video coverage of the Summit is available on the White House site. (From the front page of the Video section, search for “Obesity Summit”.)

Photos: The White House

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